End Recycling Contamination in Logan County

bales of recycling

The popularity and success of recycling programs in Logan County have proven to be a win-win for residents and the community. With 16 Recycling and Pay-As-You-Throw Drop-Off Centers across the county, recycling has become a way of life for many people.

As the Solid Waste District expands its programs and attracts more first-time users, it receives more and more quality recyclables. It also receives more of what it can’t recycle, often called contamination.

“Contamination happens resulting from something called ‘wishcycling,’” says District Material Recycling Facility Supervisor Mike Price. “It’s when well-intentioned, possibly excited first-time recyclers wish and hope they could recycle everything, figuring it will get sorted out at the recycling plant,” he explains. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Items that don’t belong in recycling often slow the process or injure workers.

According to District Coordinator Angel Payne, the contamination problem is fixable as long as the District keeps educating the public about the recycling rules which often change due to market demands beyond local control.

Currently the District receives a lot of large plastic things like laundry baskets, trash cans, big plastic bins – all of which are not recyclable and need to go into the trash. Residents who are not sure about what to do with large plastic items – or any items – should call the District offices at 937-599-1253.

PLASTIC DO’s:

  • Drink and food containers: water/soda/milk/juice bottles, cartons, jugs, bottles, tubs, jars
  • Clamshell fruit, vegetable and take-out containers
  • Empty pill bottles (remove patient info)
  • Kitty litter pails 5 gallons or less
  • Plastic garden pots less than 8” in diameter (free of dirt)
  • Microwave food trays
  • Small clear rigid packaging
  • Bathroom, laundry and cleaning containers (shampoo, fabric softener)
  • Aseptics: juice boxes, broth

PLASTIC DON’Ts:

  • Styrofoam of any kind
  • Large bulky or rigid plastics (larger than a 5-gallon bucket like kiddie pools, drums)
  • Composites: more than one kind of plastic or with attached metal rivets, bolts
  • Construction, renovation or demolition-related debris such as vinyl siding, pipe, tubing, pool liners
  • Film, such as food wrap, plastic grocery bags
  • Sports equipment (helmets)
  • Shower curtains and rings
  • Toys, garden hoses, Christmas lights, window blinds
  • Buckets, dishwear

Glass is also a category that can bring up some confusion. The District does not accept window panes, auto glass, ceramic cookware, China dishes and Mason jars. They do accept household container glass including beer bottles, wine bottles and food bottles and jars.

Recycling: Contamination Matters

Some of the biggest contributors to contamination are electronics, paint, household hazardous waste, clothes, ammunition, batteries and needles.

Many of these items could cause the recycling equipment to jam or shut down for repair which costs valuable time and money. There is also the possibility of injury to workers from exploding batteries and ammunition along with needle sticks.

Plus, from an economic standpoint, the District strives to keep the recycling bales they produce as clean as possible for sale on the market.

How You Can Help

Don’t follow the crowd. When you visit the Recycling and PAYT Drop-off Centers don’t assume that just because someone else has thrown a plastic lawn chair into the plastics bin that you can, too. Those aren’t recyclable in Logan County.

Research the recycling programs in your county. All of Logan County’s recycling information is presented here www.logancountyrecycles.com.

Take advantage of the District’s special recycling opportunities and events such as the Center for Hard to Recycle Materials (CHARM) and the daily electronics collections offered.

Once you know the rules, lead by example.

Learn more about how to recycle in Logan County. When you recycle more, you save on your Pay-As-You-Throw trash costs. Find one of our 16 Recycling and Pay-As-You-Throw drop-off centers near you.

9 Comments

  1. Lee Detrick on July 20, 2018 at 8:14 pm

    What about gallon ice cream buckets? And what is the difference between mason jars and glass food jars?

    • LoganAdmin on July 24, 2018 at 4:42 pm

      Yes, we do accept gallon ice cream buckets that are clean.

      Mason Jars are unfortunately not recyclable because mason jars are made up of the same type of glass as window glass (soda lime glass, flat glass). It is subject to a different manufacturing process (annealing), making it incompatible with the recycling process that exists for household container glass. We recommend reusing or rehoming the containers if still usable. If they are broken however, they will need to be disposed of in the garbage.

  2. Diane on July 24, 2018 at 3:14 am

    Why are Mason jars not recyclable

    • LoganAdmin on July 24, 2018 at 4:44 pm

      Mason jars are unfortunately not recyclable because mason jars are made up of the same type of glass as window glass (soda lime glass, flat glass). It is subject to a different manufacturing process (annealing), making it incompatible with the recycling process that exists for household container glass. We recommend reusing or rehoming the containers if still usable. If they are broken however, they will need to be disposed of in the garbage.

  3. Steve Mortimer on July 24, 2018 at 2:59 pm

    I was always under the impression that plastic items containing the triangle 1 and 2 are the only plastic items that are recycled. And those plastic items with the triangle 3,4 and 5 are non recyclable and handled as trash.
    Can you clarify this?

    • LoganAdmin on July 25, 2018 at 4:05 pm

      Plastics
      Forget the numbers in the triangle on the bottoms of your household containers.
      Drink and food containers: water/soda/milk/juice bottles, cartons, jugs, bottles, tubs, jars;
      • Clamshell fruit, vegetable and take-out containers;
      • Empty pill bottles (remove patient info);
      • Kitty litter pails 5 gallon or less;
      • Plastic garden pots less than 8” in diameter (free of dirt)
      • Microwave food trays;
      • Small clear rigid packaging
      • Bathroom, laundry and cleaning containers (shampoo, fabric softener, etc)
      • Aseptics: juice boxes, broth, etc

      Plastic DON’Ts:
      • Styrofoam of any kind
      • Large bulky or rigid plastics (larger than a 5-gallon bucket like kiddie pools, drums etc);
      • Composites: more than one kind of plastic or with attached metal rivets, bolts, etc
      • Construction, renovation or demolition-related debris such as vinyl siding, pipe, tubing, pool liners;
      • Film, such as foodwrap, plastic grocery bags, etc;
      • Sports equipment (helmets, etc);
      • Shower curtains and rings;
      • Toys, garden hoses, Christmas lights, window blinds;
      • Buckets, dish wear

      Please let us know if you have any additional questions!

  4. Donna on July 25, 2018 at 1:15 am

    Thanks for the update. Love having easy access to recycling. Thank you, there are a lot of places that want you to recycle, but do not have the easy access, so I am doubly grateful to you all. I will continue to recycle and thank my lucky stars we have you all. Question. The metal cutting edge on the aluminum foil, wax paper, etc. boxes, is that recyclable with the metal cans? Thanks! ☮️💖🌼

    • LoganAdmin on July 26, 2018 at 8:58 pm

      Throw the entire box (whole) into the paper recycling. The amount of metal on the paperboard is so minuscule that it is considered ok.

  5. Lee Detrick on September 21, 2018 at 12:57 pm

    What about aerosol spray cans.

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